The Opening Ceremony

What did you think of the opening ceremony at the Olympic Games? Did you go? Are you watching the games? We would love to know what you think of them.

The Olympics are a great way for strong and courageous athletes to show their talent off to the world and even earn prizes and gain world records.

Though fake, the Queen, Queen Elizabeth jumped from a helicopter in the opening ceremony. For some reason she was impersonated by a man. Was there not a woman who looks like the Queen prepared to jump out of a plane? Mr. Bean (Johnny English) was playing the one note over and over again, then the music stopped and he filled in by playing a solo on the piano.

We found out when we skyped Marc this morning that normal people were chosen to perform in the opening ceremony. Marc was of them. He is a friend of Mrs Caldwell’s and he took our flat mascot with him to the Olympic stadium.

All of the pre-dancers had a chance to audition and more than half made it into the dance sessions. It took more than a year to learn the steps with over 100 sessions taking around 45 minutes each to complete, but well worth it because the moves were almost automatic to the dancers.

So far some of the athletes have even beaten their PB (personal best ) by more than 2 seconds. The weights from weightlifting were very heavy and around 100kg. Some weightlifters could only carry for around half of the expected time. Though some failing but still chugging away this year’s olympics will be a very close one.

By George, Year 6

Neinstein’s at the Olympics!

It was so exciting to see our Flat Neinstein not only at the opening ceremony but IN in it!
Flat Neinstein is our class logo/mascot.
He has been on an amazing, top secret adventure in the past week.You see, not only did he manage to make it to London in time for the Olympic Games… he actually rode in the pocket of one of the awesome performers!

 


Today we skyped with Marc at the start of the day and he told us all about the opening of the games and the many hours that he and the rest of the cast spent practising this. (Watch out for this post tomorrow!)

Neinstein will be off to a few games over the next week and will then be off to the Paralympics! How lucky is he?

We will be looking for hosts to look after Neinstein on his journey home. We hope that he can visit every continent and maybe a few islands in between! Let us know if you can help him get home in September!

by the Neinsteins

Marae Visit


To celebrate Maori language week, Room 9 went to a Marae called Araiteuru Marae to learn about the Maori culture and marae protocol. At the Marae, we did lots of fun things. Some of them brought us out of our comfort zone. Some things like the hongi. The hongi is when two people lightly touch noses. Translated into English, it means the breath of life. We had to hongi all of the staff there and so did the teachers. After that we sang the staff there sang a waita to us. Once we had both sang we got split into three groups and went off to do activates.

On the first activity we did, we all shared our Mihi

Tag!

Tag!

We’re IT!

The Room 9 Einsteins are so excited to be a part of this global project and think it is so funny that the blog has literally been passed over the hill from Mosgiel to Dunedin in the South Island of New Zealand!

We are a class of 31 Year 5 and 6 students who absolutely love blogging and the audience feedback it provides. It is this feedback that really helps our learning because everything we share is “for real” and we take on board what suggestions people give to us.

We are about to start vlogging and think that we might share the beginnings of our journey here so that we can get some real help and advice.

In the meantime, here is a “window” to our classroom…

Learning with the Neinsteins… on PhotoPeach

On the Marae…

We have been learning with the Maori NIE for Maori language week. (NIE stands for Newspapers in Education.) We acted out visiting a Marae. It was lots of fun. First of all Sam did a haka. We walked forwards and Sam put down the koha.

Bottle Bivy Build

We have been working with a group of teachers around New Zealand to build a bottle bivy. You can check it out on the Bottle Bivy Build Blog or our class blog.
When we got to school on Monday the bivy had collapsed again. We do not know why? Maybe we didn’t have it balanced correctly, maybe the glue gets brittle in the cold over the weekend?
Today Zack’s dad came for a visit. He works for Ullrich Aluminium and he is very clever. He is going to help us with a framework to start all over again. We think it will be even better this time. What do you think?

Winter in New Zealand…

Walking on the ice.

On Tuesday Georgia and Ciara walked on the ice. It was really cold and our ears were nearly blue. The puddles that were there that night were frozen. All of the ground was white with frost. Our legs were nearly stuck together and our fingers were numb. When we got to school the sun was shining it was nearly warm.

New Zealand loses a treasure – taonga

Margaret Mahy

Yesterday on the 23rd of July Margaret Mahy sadly passed away. She died in Christchurch. She has written more then 100 books. They are all very great to read. They suit all ages. You can read them whenever you like. Today in Room6 they read The Moon and Famer McPhee. It was a finalist in the children book awards. It was a really good book because of the describing words used and the awesome pictures of animals on the pages. Brya and Chelsea like all of the books but mostly The Witch in the Cherry Tree and Adventures of the Robber pig. Laura likes The Lion in the Meadow but she mostly likes the three legged Cat and The witch in the Cherry tree. Everyone around the world will miss Margaret Mahys new books but they will have her old books. Margaret Mahy was famous for her writing and the pictures that go with the stories. In St Mary

Watching Kapa Haka

Kapa Haka was in the hall on Monday showing us what they learn and some of the songs they sing. Also earlier that day they went to the library. They showed us lots of different Maori songs. They sang clearly and you could see all of their mouths open. Their actions were very strong. I can